Forums » The Gnomes

Do Gnomes have a shelf life?

    • 94 posts
    July 18, 2017 8:20 AM PDT

    It's funny, because these gnomes obviously don't belong on shelves. But as I was looking into the lore a bit, I was curious how a gnome would go about dying. They are made of magic and they are technically souls already, but they aren't quite dead.

    So my question is, do gnomes pass into the afterlife? How do they die? What kills them? Does their magical/ethereal self just lose light and they fade away? If that happens, does their armor just fall right where its at? WHAT HAPPENS?! D:

    • 331 posts
    July 18, 2017 12:25 PM PDT

    Magic is nothing more than energy. All energy will eventually burn out. I would assume being ethereal energy housed in a pysical form, they would eventually exhaust their energy and fade away into nothing. Leaving the inorganic shell behind.

    • 26 posts
    July 18, 2017 10:35 PM PDT

    I thought energy doesn't die, it just converts endlessly, changing state.

    It'd be nice to see an MMO handle death and ressurection with this in mind, and on the nose. I don't like to speculate with lore and mechanics, but if there was a game that was capable of doing that based on the already established lore, I'd say Pantheon could.

    • 607 posts
    July 19, 2017 11:49 AM PDT

    VizualAbstract said:

    I thought energy doesn't die, it just converts endlessly, changing state.

    According to the law of Conservation of Energy you are correct - energy can neither be created nor destroyed, merely converted from one form to another (more or less).  How Conservation of Energy applies to a fantasy universe, which may or may not adhere to the same laws as ours, is unclear.  Cool idea though ;)

    • 331 posts
    July 19, 2017 12:58 PM PDT

    The energy they are made of will run out, in the sense that it will get used up. All energy is converted, yes, but the magical energy would be used and converted to kinetic energy. Just like the energy you derive from food is stored in fat cells and then "burned" when you convert that energy into kinetic energy by moving around. Just your mere existance will burn some of that energy in the form of body heat. We are all constantly exuding energy, the Gnome would be no different in that. When I said "Used Up" this is what I meant, I just didn't get all super technical about the process.

    Eventually, they would use up all of their energy as their being began to lose its ability to reproduce stored energy. Just as our cells break down over time and we begin to retain less and less energy. The idea still follows the Law of Conservation of Energy. Magic is the energy driving their being as that energy is used, or converted into other forms of energy, they would become less until they had exhausted their energy stores.

    • 44 posts
    August 11, 2017 8:41 PM PDT

    Gnome meat, and organs, will keep raw under ground for as many as 12 days before starting to turn bitter and rancid.  Although their livers are not even considered edible until well after 12 days of resting.  Most tend to prefer fresh, and enjoy knowing that their Gnome was live and screaming just a few moments before hitting the cook top.  The organ meats are exquisite raw.  Incredibly sweet and delicate, like little clouds of flavor wrapped in a chewy casing.

    In a snow drift or buried in the permafrost, Gnome can keep for as many as 18 months.  They freeze quite well as the ice traps a bit of their fading magics preserving the tissue.  And they don't freezerburn... It is the strangest thing.  Much past 18 months however and the magics fail.  The meat rapidly disolves into goop once the magics are extinguished.

    If you really want to get some mileage out of your Gnome, you can dry thin slices of meat in the sun and salt them heavily.  The natural sweetness of the Gnome and the Salt combine into a fusion of salty sweet majesty.  Kept cool and dry these stripps remain edible for decades.

    If you are just making burgers or steaks, you probably don't want to store them for more than a few days, and a Roast you should try to eat within a week.

     

    Happy cooking campers.