Forums » Crafting

Which Games Should We Model Crafting After?

    • 32 posts
    August 22, 2017 8:53 AM PDT

    I liked Ultima online as so far as crafted items actually were valuable.  I think master crafter should have a chance of having their item blessed by their God and give it special properties.  Maybe you need to raise your faction with a temple per your race and receive prayer scrolls that increase the chance that when a master crafter makes something for you that it has a better chance of being a blessed item.  Make sure that when a prayer scroll is used that the crafted item appears in the bag if the buyer and not the crafter to make sure there is no problem if it is a powerful item and the crafter chooses not to sell it to the person. Or maybe the when the crafter's faction reaches a certain level they gain access to a holy forge. That way crafters could potentially have high-level items while  being focused on crafting and not having to do the dungeon crawls etc

    • 6 posts
    September 14, 2017 1:31 AM PDT

    I like SWG resource and crafting system a great deal. Second best would have been Vanguard.

    SWG appeal was that most things in game where crafter made and the best in game items where crafted. Interestly after the NGE, dungeon drops of rarer weapons could be recrafted to produce ever better items.

    • 469 posts
    September 15, 2017 6:00 AM PDT

    dizzy said:

    I like SWG resource and crafting system a great deal. Second best would have been Vanguard.

    SWG appeal was that most things in game where crafter made and the best in game items where crafted. Interestly after the NGE, dungeon drops of rarer weapons could be recrafted to produce ever better items.

    Maybe an amalgamation of that and Vanguard's system.

    • 1541 posts
    September 15, 2017 10:14 AM PDT

    dizzy said:

    I like SWG resource and crafting system a great deal. Second best would have been Vanguard.

    SWG appeal was that most things in game where crafter made and the best in game items where crafted. Interestly after the NGE, dungeon drops of rarer weapons could be recrafted to produce ever better items.

    I've heard so many good things about SWG crafting that I'm kicking myself I never played the game. From what everyone has said about it though I agree having some elements of SWG would indeed be cool. But because I have no first hand experience of SWG I can only go off what other people have said.

    In fact thinking about it I'm going to go off and watch some SWG YouTube videos right now to see what all the fuss is about.

    • 3215 posts
    September 15, 2017 10:23 AM PDT

    SWG was a heck of a lot of fun..we had houses to decorate,  matter of fact I built my own makeshift giant fish tank...out of furniture and suspended fish in mid air...no water,  but you could use your imagination to build things.   

    Pvp in the streets...the cantina where the entertainers could heal mind wounds,  later in the game you could use an incubator and possibly create a rare animal..for either pet purposes, or mounts.  It was I guess what you would think of as a sandbox game.    In the start there was a class called Creature Handler,  the CH could go out into the wilds and capture baby animals,  raise them up as pets or mounts,   a lot of CHs would give away baby animals to us entertainers (I was an Elder Master Dancer in those days) 

      Senior entertainers would invite newbie entertainers to their groups to help the newcomers level up.   We would heal the mind wounds of the fighters that came in to use our healing services.    We would buy long lasting buffs off the Doctors,  that would help us heal the fighters that came in. 

     That really was a community where everyone depended on the talents of everyone else to get ahead.    Too bad this game is gone...sunsetted.    I wonder if Pantheon will adopt some of the things I mentionned...that SWG had,   over time.      Also they had a class think they were Image Designers (can't remember the correct term)  you could go visit them and pay them to change your looks on your character...even to how tall, how short,  if I remember correctly.     

     

    Cana

    • 1541 posts
    September 15, 2017 10:40 AM PDT

    CanadinaXegony said:

    SWG was a heck of a lot of fun..we had houses to decorate,  matter of fact I built my own makeshift giant fish tank...out of furniture and suspended fish in mid air...no water,  but you could use your imagination to build things.   

    Pvp in the streets...the cantina where the entertainers could heal mind wounds,  later in the game you could use an incubator and possibly create a rare animal..for either pet purposes, or mounts.  It was I guess what you would think of as a sandbox game.    In the start there was a class called Creature Handler,  the CH could go out into the wilds and capture baby animals,  raise them up as pets or mounts,   a lot of CHs would give away baby animals to us entertainers (I was an Elder Master Dancer in those days) 

      Senior entertainers would invite newbie entertainers to their groups to help the newcomers level up.   We would heal the mind wounds of the fighters that came in to use our healing services.    We would buy long lasting buffs off the Doctors,  that would help us heal the fighters that came in. 

     That really was a community where everyone depended on the talents of everyone else to get ahead.    Too bad this game is gone...sunsetted.    I wonder if Pantheon will adopt some of the things I mentionned...that SWG had,   over time.      Also they had a class think they were Image Designers (can't remember the correct term)  you could go visit them and pay them to change your looks on your character...even to how tall, how short,  if I remember correctly.     

     

    Cana

    Just watched a 10 minute video about armour in SWG. Now that sounded cool :). I hear there is an emulator for it but apparently you still need the CDs for the game and I have no idea where to get them second hand so I can try it out. I might have a look on eBay and see if I can find someone selling them so I can try it out and see what everyone is talking about.

    Edit: Hmm looks like you can get SWG discs for about £25 on eBay. Now I'm really tempted :).

    Edit 2: Oh man. The more I read about this the more tempted I am to buy it second hand. Sounds like it is something that I'd really enjoy.


    This post was edited by Cromulent at September 15, 2017 12:10 PM PDT
    • 6 posts
    September 15, 2017 11:59 PM PDT

    Cromulent said:

    Just watched a 10 minute video about armour in SWG. Now that sounded cool :). I hear there is an emulator for it but apparently you still need the CDs for the game and I have no idea where to get them second hand so I can try it out. I might have a look on eBay and see if I can find someone selling them so I can try it out and see what everyone is talking about.

    Edit: Hmm looks like you can get SWG discs for about £25 on eBay. Now I'm really tempted :).

    Edit 2: Oh man. The more I read about this the more tempted I am to buy it second hand. Sounds like it is something that I'd really enjoy.

    Keep in mind it is an old school game and is difficult to get a start into. No hand holding at all and it is a sandbox. Expect the Interface/UI to be challenging :)

    Feel free to message me.

    Good luck.

    • 2 posts
    September 20, 2017 8:01 AM PDT

    One thing I did like about SW Galaxies was the capability to teach others half of your current skill level. Just my 2 cents


    This post was edited by Akumoako at September 20, 2017 8:02 AM PDT
    • 1435 posts
    September 25, 2017 3:40 PM PDT

    I realize that I"m super late to this thread but just wanted to add my 2 gp to it :)

    I think we need to separate the crafting "system" - that is, the actual process for making an item - from the crafting "economy", or how the game handles what goes into the item, how you sell the item, and so on.

    In terms of crafting systems:

    - I really liked vanguard's system of having modifier components (dusts, etc) to get different effects on the finished items.  There was a lot of potential there for item variety, and item variety is a good thing.  That said, one of the issues in vanguard's crafting system was that some of those effects sounded a lot better than they actually were in practice.

    - I really enjoy FFXIV's crafting system in terms of having to balance between the durability of your components and the quality of the item you want to make.  There's enough randomness to the system that it keeps things interesting, while still rewarding skill on the part of the crafter.  Using those different crafting actions intelligently will give you a much better result than taking the easy way out or mindlessly pressing buttons.

    - Both games did something that I think is really important and that was to have actual crafting gear with stats that matter.  So just like adventuring, if you wanted to be a good crafter you paid attention to your tools/gear.  They both also did that for harvesting/gathering.

    In terms of crafting economies:

    - I loved SWG for the ability to set up an actual shop and sell my wares.  Not some lame auction house system where people are clicking on a thing half a world away, but a real place on the map where people could go to browse the stuff that I was selling and purchase whatever they desired.  Combined with meaningful travel, it added so much to the game because location mattered just as much as quality and prices.  I know Pantheon probably couldn't go quite that far but I'd love to see an economic system that doesn't just make it all about who's willing to undercut the most on the market board.

    - I loved EVE Online's economy because 99% of the things players used were made by other players.  Everything from ammunition to ships on up - and all of the resources that were used to make them were also gathered by other players, through mining, or combat, or whatever.  So the more of that we can get into Pantheon, the more I'll enjoy crafting.

    - I love FFXIV's itemization because with maybe three exceptions, every single thing that drops from a monster has a use - usually in a crafting recipe.  It really changes the dynamics when *nothing* is a trash drop, and everything can be used by a crafter to make something.

    - I think it's super important that items be useful enough and hard enough to make that there's sustainable demand for them.  There's two aspects to this.  First of all, if everyone who starts crafting can forge steel longswords of supreme quality within the first week, then supreme-quality steel longswords no longer have any value.  The markets will be flooded in short order, prices will tank, and people will start to say "well crafting really isn't worth it, is it?"  The second aspect is that if items become obsolete too quickly, they'll lose value.  So if you buy that supreme-quality steel longsword, and then 2 levels later you're replacing it with a supreme-quality mythril longsword, and then two levels after that you're replacing it with a supreme-quality adamantite longsword.... seriously, why bother spending the money on the good stuff when you're just going to replace it next week?  So I think it's really important that the game's item progression be balanced both to provide opportunities for upgrades, but to insure that players value the things they're using at any given moment, and it isn't just seen as needless filler to satisfy the crafters.

    - I loved Vanguard's group harvesting dynamic where you got more resources from a node if you had a party hitting that node with you.  It was simple but it worked.

    - I loved Vanguard's community crafting, where you had to get a bunch of people working together to build a ship or a guild hall (unless you wanted it to take forever to finish)

    - Finally, and again not specific to any one game, I really like it when the there is a strong balance between crafted items and loot, so that one doesn't eclipse the other but instead they add to each other.  The adventurer in me wants loot, and wants it to be cool - but the way I see it is this.  If I kill the dragon, maybe I find a sword in it's treasure horde.  Or maybe I find the hilt of a sword with a broken blade, that could be reforged with the right materials.  Or maybe I find a gem, that could be set into the hilt of a sword, granting it great power.  All three should be viable options, and things should be balanced that they're all three seen by players as meaningful rewards.

    The best crafting system?  One that can successfully combine all of (or as many of) these aspects :)

    • 10 posts
    September 25, 2017 5:39 PM PDT

    Great question as we all have our favorites....mine would be Elder Scrolls. So many actually are quite the same but in that game there is allot of resources to gather from the environment to be successful. I liked the depth of the crafting and the amount of crafting professions available to the players. I will say the only part of the crafting system that I did not care for is the length of time it takes to complete some of the more detailed professions such as researching would take in order to learn crafting armor, or in some cases finding the needed items to reasearch. I do enjoy the crafting in all of the games I have played, whether simple or complicated; but not overly deep as I get bored with the entire process then. Simple sometimes keeps people more interested then entire gameplay of the day devoted to crafting in my opinion. .....Should be perhaps satisfying but not grossly overworked? I would also like to add that Black Desert Online had a fresh approach to gameplay with Horse Taming as a profession.....I found that to be even more enjoyable than some of the other crafting available on that game.....taming and breeding; unique! I'll be looking forward to trying out the crafting with much enthusiasm; every games approach is unique and that is what is the most enjoyable in mmo game crafting.....awesome! Game On :)


    This post was edited by thera at September 25, 2017 5:41 PM PDT
    • 3 posts
    October 5, 2017 12:58 PM PDT
    Whatever it is simply put should have elements of exploration, grind and RNG determined outcomes.
    • 878 posts
    October 5, 2017 5:38 PM PDT

    I would like to see more types of items that can make the same result, but say with different stats. Say in EQ you needed a bearskin to make a back pack. Why couldn't you make a backpack out of other types of skin, but with different results?

    You have a variety of types of pelts; wolf, bear, cat, etc. They should all be able to create the same thing. Within those groups you also have higher and lower quality pelts that would raise or lower the end result quality. It would just give you more options for combinations of items for skill ups.

    • 78 posts
    October 16, 2017 6:37 PM PDT

    SWG Hands down. I was the first Master Architect on Star Sider. Everything you did from gathering to constructing gave a huge sense of accomplishment!

    As mentioned before the fact that what you crafted bore your name went as far as advertisement and word of mouth if your product was consistently superior.

    • 1435 posts
    October 16, 2017 9:54 PM PDT

    I started to post this in the thread about Vanguard crafting but then realized that this thread is probably better for it.  Disclaimer:  All of the below is Neph's opinion and experience from those games.  It's probably obvious from the below but I also feel like it's important that the game economy, itemization, and crafting system (which are all critical to making crafting work) be set up so that people who join the game and start crafting months or years after launch aren't penalized directly or indirectly.

    Vanguard had a pretty good system, but I don't know that I would duplicate it 100%.

    Here's a quick list of what stood out for me (good and bad) in Vanguard and other games.


    UO:
    The good:  Crafting felt very authentic.  Ex:  Go out to mountains, mine ore.  Take ore back to town, smelt it.  Use smelted ore to make shields.
    The bad:  Crafting was really tough on inventory space.  Plus, selling things was...well, it wasn't easy.

    EQ:
    The good:  It took a long time to master any craft, and the risk of failure (losing materials) made the progression feel very meaningful.  Racial and faction-based recipes were very cool.
    The bad:  Crafting was a HUGE, almost punitive money sink.  Also, I think I spent more time looking up recipes on EQCrafters than I actually did making them.

    E&B:
    The good:  Components and materials made sense - some things were harvests, others were drops.  You needed both.  Analyzing loot to learn recipes so you could then craft better versions of them.  Trade runs and trade experience (though this wasn't crafting per se).
    The bad:  Quality was luck-based though influenced by skill.  No market for items that weren't max quality.  Penalizing for crafters just getting started who couldn't afford to throw away resources as easily.

    SWG:
    The good:  Randomized resource stats.  Experimentation points.  Unparalleled customization.  Player shops (with location actually making a difference, at least for the first couple of years).  The maker's mark - Being acknowledge as one of the top crafters on your server because people could see who made their stuff.
    The bad:  Resource system made it incredibly luck-based for new crafters to get a foothold in the market.  Not to mention they were also penalized on experimentation points.  This promoted mindless grinding.

    EQ2:
    The good:  Interdependency between crafting professions (until that got nerfed).  Initial complication system would actually kill you if you messed up enough (though it was a little silly to see people die to a loom).
    The bad:  Complications were trivialized once you got to a certain point, and as long as you paid attention you could produce an A-grade item every time.  Interdependency got nerfed.  Itemization was terrible, lots of stuff you could make would never get used.  As the game got older, rares became more and more common to where you pretty much had to be using rares if you wanted to sell anything at all.

    Vanguard:
    The good:  Dusts.  Crafting quests.  Specialized crafting equipment (with stats that mattered).  Group harvesting.  Collaborative crafting (ships, houses, guild halls)
    The bad:  With enough practice you could guarantee top quality every time.  Abilities granted by dusts weren't always useful on items.  Itemization was a little haphazard (though still better than EQ2).

    EVE:
    The good:  99.99% of items players used were crafted.  The economy drove every other activity in the game.  New players could instantly participate by mining low-end resources which were needed in huge quantities.
    The bad:  This sort of thing only really works in a full-PvP game like EVE, though it can be done in moderation in PvE games :)  In PvE games, you need loot to incentivize content.

    FFXIV:
    The good:  Crafting system emphasizes skill but still has a luck component.  You can have top gear and do everything right and sometimes RNG will still bite you.  Specialized crafting equipment.  With about three exceptions, every single piece of loot dropped by a monster is used in a crafting recipe.
    The bad:  The way loot and quest rewards are implemented means that the market for a crafted item tends to be feast or famine.  Sometimes, there's no competition apart from other crafters.  Other times the market's flooded with the dropped version.  Also, the various tools the game gives people to advance crafting experience mean that lots of people grind out (or buy) items solely to advance their crafting levels, rather than really taking part in the economy until they hit max level.  This means that lower-level stuff is in many cases more expensive than higher level stuff for people buying (supply/demand).  It also means that crafting can be unfulfilling at high levels - you make that awesome sword, then realize that there's 57 other people selling that same sword and they're all in a price war with each other.

    I'm leaving out a bunch of other games like WoW, RIFT, LOTRO, STO/NVW, GW2, etc. because they all mostly use the "get stuff and click to make item" style of crafting which I don't think we really want.  Likewise I am not a fan of the SWTOR and BDO concept where you're too good to craft yourself and instead you have an NPC do it for you.  Personal opinion there :P

    • 17 posts
    October 18, 2017 1:46 AM PDT

    All of the above posts are great, and seems like most people on the same page.  However, for me, the most important part of crafting is the immersion.  Vanguard definitely had it, it felt like it was the beating heart of the game.  I mean, building a ship to sail the sea's or building your future house to live in were great.

    Everquest 2's crafting system, for me, didnt have hte same kind of immersion.  Don't get me wrong, it was a cracking crafting system, well designed and well thought out, but for me, it felt like it was there to tick a box.

    The way Pantheon is shaping up, with crafting certain items only available in certain zones for example, I don't think it matters too much how which system they adopt for me, I will be hooked :)

    • 9 posts
    October 19, 2017 4:18 PM PDT

    Hello all,

    I LOVE the direction that Pantheon has taken as far as a group centric mmo with some real challenge built in. And to be honest, from the streams that I've seen of it so far, it looks a LOT like EQ. Even the buff sound effects reminded me of EQ! 

    But when it comes to crafting, I hope they go a different direction. I always felt as though the RNG attached to crafting in classic EQ was too costly to embark take a chance on. I haven't played many MMO's, but have spent time in EQ, WoW, and ESO (elder scrolls online). Of those, I'd have to say that my favorite has been ESO. I liked the idea that the most powerful widly available items were crafted. Set bonuses work well for creating this and in ESO's case gives reason to travel great distances and sometimes through difficult areas to create those items. Even casual players were able to eventually craft top-tier gear through this method. I understand that raiding will always be the source of the highest end gear. But for those of us that simply can't dedicate the kind of time that raiding guilds demand any longer, I'd like to feel like my grind still has a chance of paying off.

    Thanks for reading.

     

    Cheers!

     

    SkyTaco AKA Sarrs

    • 94 posts
    October 21, 2017 6:38 PM PDT

    I, as many others have stated previously, enjoyed the crafting systems employed in both Star Wars Galaxies and Vanguard: Saga of Heroes.  In addition, I particually enjoyed the group harvesting mechanics found in Vanguard.  For those unfamiliar with the group harvesting mechanics in Vanguard, I will list them below.  Ironically, even though the game is only available via EMU, information is still available on Vanguard Wikia.  

    Group Harvesting

    There are many advantages to harvesting in a group rather than by yourself.

    You generally see faster harvesting skill increases (eg. harvesting, reaping, skinning, mining, etc.)

    The nodes produce more based on the number of people physically harvesting at the same time.This becomes especially important when harvesting rare resource nodes.

    You can harvest nodes you haven't specialized in if, you have the appropriate tool for the node, your general harvest skill is high enough for the node, and a groupmate has the harvest specialization starts the harvesting process.

    Your chances or find rare resources and catalysts (dusts, powders, stitching, etc.) increases.

    To engage in group harvesting you must be already formed in a group. Once one person begins to harvest a resource, others can join in with that person as long as they meet the following requirements:

    They possess the necessary tool in their toolbelt to harvest that resource. Their "Harvesting" skill is of sufficiently high to harvest the resource. If you do not meet the requirements to harvest the resource, you will not be allowed to take part in the harvest. One example is a group harvesting Slate, a Tier 2 Quarrying Resource. The player with quarrying would need to have 100 quarrying skill, the others in the group would need 100 harvesting skill to help.

    Once the group is finished harvesting the resource node, the looting rights of the node will depend on the loot options set by the group leader.

    When starting, the toolbelt you receive is large enough to place one of every basic harvesting tool inside it. Its a great idea to pick one of each up as they are cheap and you may never know when your group will come across a rare resource!


    This post was edited by Louden at October 21, 2017 6:42 PM PDT
    • 979 posts
    November 1, 2017 7:56 AM PDT

    I think it might be helpful to break down crafting systems into a few sub systems to break out what we like best and why.

    The sub systems I see are as follows:

    1. Resource Variation:
    2. Recipe Trees:
    3. Final product Customization:
    4. Active Crafting Process:
    5. Interactions with Dropped equipment:
    6. End game crafted item relevance:

    Using that list I would say the following:

    1. Resource Variation:  SWG-lite  -  Each material type having grades, say 5 from poor to pristine, is a good way to differentiate training combines from end game viable items without horribly bloating the inventory management.
    2. Recipe Trees:  SWG +ultra  -  From learning how to make an item by destroying it,  to being able to substitute materials in a specific class to have different final stats of a specific item then those stats are in turn effected by the material quality.
    3. Final product appearance customization:  ESOish  -  I like being able to apply racial style to the recipe to change the base model and a way to modify the color scheme.  Bonus points if base item models can be “learned” and crafters can create a color pattern that is time consuming and complex that can be saved to create a trade mark look.
    4. Active Crafting Process:  I don’t have a clear preference on this though many people seem favorable to the Vanguard system that I never had a chance to experience.  Lots of clicking on stacks and hitting combine and having the RNG ream you is not fun.
    5. Interactions with Dropped equipment:  SWG/DaoC/Skyrim – SWG splicing items to have a chance to improve them or destroy them, DaoC being able to salvage items for raw crafting materials and Skyrim blacksmithing to ugrade dropped items though I think this would be cooler if it was a limited duration buff.
    6. End game crafted item relevance: Again not sure of a good correlation.  I’d like to see crafting being end game viable but for customization reasons rather than ease of access.  I would say roughly that it should be twice as hard to make an end game comparable item as it is to loot the same item to “pay” for getting the exact item you need and the look customization.

     

     

    My Vision of what I would like to see:

    I think it would be great if you first made an item design; selecting the base item (longsword), blade style (elven guard-blade), blade Metal type (sky metal), hilt style (Holy Guard), hilt metal (dwarven steel), color map.

    Then a mini game interacting with the crafting stations to work your way through the process consuming materials building up through sub steps where fails can be retried to further the progress on the design.  The final step is the only one that cannot “fail” but its final result is dependent on the quality of sub components and could still have some variation.

    After this base item is made it can be passed onto and enchanter to add magical effects, temporary or permanent. (stats permanent and procs temporary)

    The styles can be learned from studying/destroying base items, access to different metals is learned through training with masters and trade skill minimum experience, base designs are learned from teachers or dropped designs with minimum experience requirements, color patterns consume dyes making some colors harder to get.

     

    Though purging again, thanks for reading

    Trasak


    This post was edited by Trasak at November 1, 2017 7:56 AM PDT
    • 20 posts
    November 1, 2017 5:38 PM PDT

    Going to go off the reservation here and suggest something different.... I play a game on my phone called Marvel futre fight and it has a tier based crafting system (based on 1-6 stars). let's say you loot a bat wing for instance and it has one star. You have two options, create what you can based on that one star, or combine two one star bat wings to make a two star bat wing which ultimately would be better than the afore mentioned one star. There would be risk (fails) associatied with making higher tier items (six star being the highest in this example). So would be crafters would have to gain an excessive amount of items to get to five or six star, but if succesfull the finished product would be much better than say... a one star dagger vs. a six star dagger.

     

     Just a thought to throw something different out there. Thoughts?

    • 979 posts
    November 2, 2017 4:39 AM PDT

    Straightevil, 

    In a system with material quality tiers there is often a refinement process to upgrade from a lower tier to a higher tier at an increasing ratio of cost vs output.

    An example would be:

    4 Poor Quality steel + 1sp Flux = Low Quality steel

    5 Low Quality steel + 1 gp Flux = Mild Steel

    6 Mild Steel + 1pp Flux = High Quality Steel

    7 High Quality Steel + Alchemist made requiring drops flux = Ultra High strength Steel

    8 Ultra High Strength Steel + Rare boss drop Flux = Nano Steel

     

    Please forgive my steel industry reference but I am in favor of this general model and could be another way for multiple crafting skills to interact.

    • 196 posts
    November 2, 2017 9:09 AM PDT

    I kinda like the EQ model for crafting as it currently stands. Stacking size for various materials will probably play a huge part as will being able to craft from your bank; although, this seems to make no sense as you should be required to have the materials on you when at the respective "shops" doing your thing.

    • 979 posts
    November 2, 2017 10:03 AM PDT

    Holywind said:

    I kinda like the EQ model for crafting as it currently stands. Stacking size for various materials will probably play a huge part as will being able to craft from your bank; although, this seems to make no sense as you should be required to have the materials on you when at the respective "shops" doing your thing.

    Would you mind expanding on what you like about the EQ crafting model?  I’m assuming you are referring to the current live crafting system and not the Project 1999 version as the launch version of EQ crafting required you to hand place items into a crafting device and hit combine.  If you put in items that did not match a recipe the crafting device would eat your materials.  The live version has a lists of recipes you select and will auto place the materials from your inventory into the crafting station and will batch combine them.

    • 196 posts
    November 2, 2017 10:22 AM PDT

    Trasak said:

    Would you mind expanding on what you like about the EQ crafting model?  I’m assuming you are referring to the current live crafting system and not the Project 1999 version as the launch version of EQ crafting required you to hand place items into a crafting device and hit combine.  If you put in items that did not match a recipe the crafting device would eat your materials.  The live version has a lists of recipes you select and will auto place the materials from your inventory into the crafting station and will batch combine them.

     

    The current live version. Not that P99 garbage.

    • 32 posts
    November 2, 2017 11:47 AM PDT
    I liked ffxiv crafting and gathering. I don't think it needs to be as involved with needing certain gear to increase crafting stats. I would prefer a simple skill based system but more involved than original eq put stuff in a bag and combine.
    • 389 posts
    November 2, 2017 1:35 PM PDT

    Although I personally am not a fan of crafting i will say i have tried crafting in most games I have played , Vanguard crafting to me seemed the most interesting ( what with the crafting clothing with mutiple type of problem solving , ingunuity, reasoning , finesse ) .  I found Vanguard crafting to be the most pleasant and fun . 

    I am okay with whatever they  Implement . .. ( I will Try it )